Previous Events

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  • 11/03/2017 - 10:00 to 15:00
    Otago Museum, 419 Great King Street, Dunedin North
    Presenter

    Brain Day Dunedin 2017 – Brain Research: Making Headlines

    The Neurological Foundation and the University of Otago are pleased to present a programme of thought-provoking interviews and lecture during Brain Awareness Week 2017.

    10:00am – 11:00am  – Moved by the Mind, Dr Angus McMorland, University of Auckland – Interview with Allan Baddock

    In this interview motor control neurophysiologist Dr McMorland will discuss his research into how the brain controls movement; how movement is impaired in disorders such as stroke, and his investigations into the use of cutting-edge engineering technology to recover movement.

     

    11:00am – 12:00pm – Mind over machines, Dr Calvin Young, University of Otago – Lecture

    Research Calvin Kai Young will explain how we can physically control equipment with our own mind as well as the science behind it, which is enabling us to develop everything from prosthetic limbs to drones that are controlled by the mind.

     

    12:00pm – 1:00pm – Lunch Break

    Time with community groups and interactive brain displays

     

    1:00pm – 2:00pm – Healthy cognition: Maintaining it as we age, Dr Liana Machado, University of Otago – Interview with Allan Baddock

    In this interview Dr Machado will discuss healthy cognition and how all ages can maintain this through exercise and nutrition.

     

    2:15pm – 3:15pm, Repairing the brain after stroke: Hopeful horizons, Dr Andrew Clarkson, University of Otago – Interview with Allan Baddock

    Dr Clarkson will discuss the wonders of neuroprotection, regeneration and repair mechanisms to improve recovery of function following a stroke and the hope for patients on the horizon.

     

    Various community support groups and the Neurological Foundation will have staff present at information stands during the day.

    No bookings required to attend lectures. Please arrive early to secure your seating.

    •  
  • 02/12/2016 - 18:30 to 20:00
    Auckland Business School, Owen G Glenn Building 12 Grafton Road, 1010
    Presenter

    There has never been a more exciting time in brain research than now. A global effort by clinicians and scientists has brought about an exponential increase in our knowledge of the human brain, and what occurs in the brain in disease and injury. These efforts, combined with innovative new technologies, and a confluence of discoveries, are having a significant impact on the development of treatments for brain disorders.  

    In this exciting FREE public panel discussion event, we bring together five international brain research pioneers from all corners of the world to shed light on their work that is unravelling the mysteries of the human brain. Together, their efforts to move this frontier field forward are shaping a path to a much brighter future for neurological patients and their families.

    Seats are limited, so please book today by clicking here

    Panellists:

    Professor Christopher Shaw (Motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory brain disease)

    Professor of Neurology and Neurogenetics at the Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience at King's College London

    Professor Anne Young (Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases)

    Distinguished Julieanne Dorn Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States

    Professor Hanns Möhler (Pharmacological treatments for brain diseases)

    Distinguished Professor at the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Zurich, Switzerland

    Professor Perry Bartlett (Human brain stem cell research)

    Professor of Molecular Neuroscience at the Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland

    Professor Richard Faull (Alzheimer’s disease)

    Distinguished Professor of Anatomy, Director of the Centre for Brain Research, University of Auckland and Director, Neurological Foundation Human Brain Bank

    This panel discussed will be chaired by Sue Giddens from the Neurological Foundation.

    Date: Friday 2 December 2016

    Time: 6:30pm – 8:00pm

    Venue: Auckland Business School, Owen G Glenn Building 12 Grafton Road, 1010

    Parking is available on site

    Registrations essential, tickets available here

     

  • 08/11/2016 - 10:00 to 11:00
    Ernest Rutherford Retirement Village, 49 Covent Drive, Stoke, Nelson 7011
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

  • 21/10/2016 - 10:30 to 11:30
    Julia Wallace Retirement Village, 28 Dogwood Way, 4414
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

     

  • 13/10/2016 - 14:00 to 15:00
    Princess Alexandra,145 Battery Rd, Hawke's Bay 4110
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

     

  • 22/09/2016 - 18:30 to 20:00
    La Vida Conference & Community Centre, 34A Hansons Lane, Christchurch
    Presenter

    In this panel discussion chaired by Sue Giddens from the Neurological Foundation, our Christchurch-based neurological experts will provide scientific and clinical perspectives of the transition from normal ageing to pathological ageing, leading to brain disorders such as Alzheimer's and dementia, Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. 

    Our panel will answer a wide range of questions including: Is an ageing brain a declining brain? Should we "use it" or lose it? What are the risk factors for brain disease as we age? What are the real future possibilities in brain reserach? What are these buzz words 'proteins', 'stem cells' and 'biomarkers'? Could we one day stop Alzheimer's disease in its tracks?

    A Q & A segment will feature for the public at the conclusion of the panel's discussion.

    Registrations essential, please click here to register

  • 08/09/2016 - 10:00 to 11:00
    Malvina Major Retirement Village, 134 Burma Road, Khandallah, Wellington 6037
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

  • 08/07/2016 - 14:00 to 15:00
    Rowena Jackson Retirement Village, 40 O'Byrne Street North, Waikiwi, Invercargill 9810
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

  • 07/07/2016 - 14:00 to 15:00
    Frances Hodgkins Retirement Village, 40 Fenton Cres, Otago 9012
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

  • 07/07/2016 - 10:30 to 11:30
    Yvette Williams Retirement Village, 383 Highgate, Roslyn, Dunedin 9010
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

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