Previous Events

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  • 20/05/2016 - 14:00 to 15:00
    Diana Isaac Retirement Village, 1 Lady Isaac Way, Mairehau, Christchurch 8052
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

  • 21/04/2016 - 14:00 to 15:00
    Hilda Ross Retirement Village, 30 Ruakura Road, Hamilton, 3216
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

  • 22/03/2016 - 11:00 to 12:00
    Edmund Hillary Retirement Village, 221 Abbotts Way, Remuera Auckland 1050
    Presenter

    In partnership with Ryman Healthcare, the Neurological Foundation is pleased to present a national public lecture programme featuring Foundation Medical Advisor Dr Jon Simcock. Dr Simcock’s popular talk, Brain disorders: progress and prospects, has achieved capacity crowds in the Foundation’s Brain Awareness Week and Annual Appeal events programmes in recent years.

    This programme will include lectures at eight of Ryman Healthcare’s villages, and will run from March 2016 through to November.

    Educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School Dr Simcock graduated from the Otago School of Medicine in 1960, and enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a neurologist after completing his training at Queens Square, London in 1968. Dr Simcock recently retired from clinical practice but has continued in his long-standing position as the Neurological Foundation’s Medical Advisor.

    Lecture overview: Brain disorders: progress and prospects

    There are more than 1,100 known neurological disorders. Your nervous system is made up of the brain, spinal cord and nerves throughout your body: together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can experience difficulty moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses or mood. In his lecture, Dr Simcock, will speak about the advancement of neurological research and the latest progress in the understanding of brain disorders. He will also discuss how the 21st century has introduced exciting new neurological investigation techniques, paving the way for enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Dr Simcock’s talk is interspersed with fascinating anecdotes from his neurology career.   

  • 17/03/2016 - 18:00 to 19:30
    Auckland Grammar School, Centennial Theatre, 23 Mountain Rd, Epsom
    Presenter

    The Changing Brain: the potential of plasticity

    Brain plasticity, also known as neuroplasticity, refers to the brain's ability to reorganise itself by forming new neural connections throughout life. Neuroplasticity allows the neurons (nerve cells) in the brain to compensate for injury and disease (such as stroke and neurodegenerative disease) and to adjust their activities in response to learning, experiences, memory formation and to changes in their environment.

    In this panel discussion, chair Associate Professor Cathy Stinear will ask our ‘plasticity panel’ about their exciting research aimed at both encouraging spontaneous recovery and targeting rehabilitation to optimise the return of function.

    A public Q&A session will be held directly after the discussion.

    Panel Chair:

    Associate Professor Cathy Stinear, Department of Medicine, CBR, University of Auckland

    Panellists:

    Professor Peter Thorne, Departments of Physiology and Audiology, CBR, University of Auckland

    Dr Clare McCann, School of Psychology, CBR, University of Auckland

    Dr Melanie Cheung, Department of Anatomy with Radiology, CBR, University of Auckland

    DON’T MISS OUT: ONLINE BOOKINGS ESSENTIAL

    REGISTER AT https://the-changing-brain.eventbrite.co.nz

  • 16/03/2016 - 18:00 to 19:30
    Auckland Grammar School, Centennial Theatre, 23 Mountain Rd, Epsom
    Presenter

    The Creative Brain:  the need for networking neurons

    In this panel discussion, Professor Ralph Buck will engage with our distinguished panel to understand the critical role that creativity plays in helping us to adapt to new experiences and environments, learn new information and create new memories - and what happens when the links between cognitive flexibility, creativity and imagination are impaired through disease and injury.

    A public Q&A session will be held directly after the discussion.

    Panel Chair:

    Associate Professor Ralph Buck, Head of Dance Studies, University of Auckland

    Panellists:

    Emeritus Professor Michael Corballis, School of Psychology, CBR, University of Auckland (and author)

    Mr Edward Mee, Clinical Director of Neurosurgery, Auckland District Health Board

    Professor Donna Rose Addis, School of Psychology, CBR, University of Auckland

    DON’T MISS OUT: ONLINE BOOKINGS ESSENTIAL

    REGISTER AT https://the-creative-brain.eventbrite.co.nz

  • 15/03/2016 - 18:00 to 19:30
    Auckland Grammar School, Centennial Theatre, 23 Mountain Rd, Epsom
    Presenter

    The Young Brain: Nature, nurture and neurodevelopment

    The development of the brain from embryo to adulthood is determined by a complex combination of genetic and environmental influences. For some individuals these factors can affect brain development and result in neurodevelopmental conditions such as Autism Spectrum Disorder, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and intellectual delay.

    In this panel discussion, chair Dr Jessie Jacobsen will explore the biology underlying these conditions and examine various new targets for management and treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders with some of New Zealand’s leading researchers in this field.

    A public Q&A session will be held directly after the discussion.

    Panel Chair:

    Dr Jessie Jacobsen, School of Biological Sciences, Centre for Brain Research (CBR), University of Auckland

    Panellists:

    Associate Professor Karen Waldie, School of Psychology, CBR, University of Auckland

    Dr Colette Muir, Paediatrician, Auckland District Health Board

    Dr Justin Dean, Department of Physiology, CBR, University of Auckland

    DON’T MISS OUT: ONLINE BOOKINGS ESSENTIAL

    REGISTER AT https://the-young-brain.eventbrite.co.nz

  • 12/03/2016 - 10:00 to 15:30
    Hutton Theatre, Otago Museum, 419 Great King Street Dunedin
    Presenter

    RESEARCH ON THE BRAIN: A DAY WITH OUR PROFESSORS

    Our professorial leaders give an intimate view into the progress of their brain research     

    Programme:

    10.00am – 11.00am: Brain disease and disorders: the genetic revolution

    Interview: Russell Snell: Professor in Genetics, The University of Auckland. Professor Snell will be interviewed by Sue Giddens from the Neurological Foundation

    In this interview, Professor Snell will provide insights into his revolutionary research involving the genetics of Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases, and autism. Recent progress in these areas of research is setting the world stage for innovative new breakthroughs – and it’s all led from Professor Snell’s lab.

     

    11.00am – 12noon: The power of the subconcious sleep and dreams

    Lecture: Professor David Bilkey, Director, University of Otago’s Brain Health Research Centre

    Dunedin Hypnotherapist Karen Hughes 

    Hypnotherapy, sleep and dreams: Professor Bilkey and hypnotherapist Karen Hughes will discuss the subconscious at work, and insightful theories of dreaming and its function.

     

    LUNCH BREAK: TIME WITH COMMUNITY GROUPS AND INTERACTIVE BRAIN DISPLAYS

     

    1.00pm – 2.00pm: Better brains for babies: protecting foetal formation    

    Interview: Associate Professor Christine Jasoni, Deputy Director, University of Otago’s Brain Health Research Centre. Associate Professor Jasoni will be interviewed by Sue Giddens

    In this interview, Associate Professor Jasoni will discuss insights gathered from her many years of developmental brain research and answer the question: How does the maternal environment during pregnancy affect the formation of the foetal brain? With conditions such as obesity and diabetes on the rise in Western society and the developing world, it is critical that we fully understand the health implications of these disorders for future generations. 

     

    2:00pm – 3.00pm: The View from the Chair of Neurosurgery 

    Interview: Dirk De Ridder: Neurological Foundation Professor of Neurosurgery, The University of Otago. Professor De Ridder will be interviewed by Sue Giddens  

    In this interview, Professor Dirk Dr Ridder, the “People’s Professor”, will outline the progress of this research and discuss how establishing New Zealand’s first academic neurosurgery unit is making a difference to the community that championed it.

      

    3.30pm: Close   

  • 12/03/2016 - 09:00 to 15:00
    The University of Auckland, Tāmaki Innovation Campus, 261 Morrin Road, St Johns, Auckland
  • 09/03/2016 - 10:00 to 11:30
    Cardboard Cathedral, 234 Hereford Street, Christchurch Central
    Presenter

    Dr Gary Small is a Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the University of California Los Angeles, and director of the UCLA Longevity Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior. His Alzheimer’s disease research has made headlines in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times and he frequently appears on The Today Show, Good Morning America and CNN. He has written six books, including The New York Times best seller, The Memory Bible, and The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program.  Scientific American magazine named him one of the world’s leading innovators in science and technology.

    Dr. Small lectures throughout the world and is visiting New Zealand in March to present two FREE public lectures (Auckland and Christchurch) and engage with our own world-class brain researchers.

    Alzheimer’s disease: Prevention is today’s best defence

    For decades, researchers have been searching for a way to cure Alzheimer’s disease, by far the most common cause of age-related mental decline and the one we fear the most. Despite considerable progress, no miracle remedy has yet been discovered. The scientific evidence points to prevention as today’s most effective way to defend against Alzheimer’s.

    Genetics accounts for only part of the risk for Alzheimer’s disease, and we now know that lifestyle choices have a tremendous impact. Considerable scientific evidence points to lifestyle as key to defending our brains from Alzheimer’s disease. Diet, mental and physical exercise, stress reduction, social engagement – these and other strategies not only improve cognitive performance quickly, but they may also delay the onset of dementia for many people.

    In his New Zealand lectures, Dr Small will outline that if we take charge of our everyday lifestyle choices, we can push back the age at which Alzheimer’s symptoms might begin – perhaps by several years, which in some cases can mean for the rest of our lives. Even if scientists one day come up with a miracle drug that can cure dementia, it will always be easier to protect healthy brain cells than to try to repair damaged ones. For now, prevention is the key to protecting our brains.

    Many people are confused about what all of the latest scientific information means and how it applies to their own lives. During this lecture, Dr Small will clarify this confusion and provide an easy-to-follow plan of action from his best-selling book The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program to improve memory ability now and optimise your brain health for the future.

    BOOKINGS ONLINE ESSENTIAL

    Register your booking at https://small-lecture-christchurch.eventbrite.co.nz

    Seats will go quickly: book early! 

  • 08/03/2016 - 10:00 to 11:30
    Bruce Mason Centre, The Promenadde, Takapuna Beach
    Presenter

    Dr Gary Small is a Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the University of California Los Angeles, and director of the UCLA Longevity Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior. His Alzheimer’s disease research has made headlines in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times and he frequently appears on The Today Show, Good Morning America and CNN. He has written six books, including The New York Times best seller, The Memory Bible, and The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program.  Scientific American magazine named him one of the world’s leading innovators in science and technology.

    Dr. Small lectures throughout the world and is visiting New Zealand in March to present two FREE public lectures (Auckland and Christchurch) and engage with our own world-class brain researchers.

    Alzheimer’s disease: Prevention is today’s best defence

    For decades, researchers have been searching for a way to cure Alzheimer’s disease, by far the most common cause of age-related mental decline and the one we fear the most. Despite considerable progress, no miracle remedy has yet been discovered. The scientific evidence points to prevention as today’s most effective way to defend against Alzheimer’s.

    Genetics accounts for only part of the risk for Alzheimer’s disease, and we now know that lifestyle choices have a tremendous impact. Considerable scientific evidence points to lifestyle as key to defending our brains from Alzheimer’s disease. Diet, mental and physical exercise, stress reduction, social engagement – these and other strategies not only improve cognitive performance quickly, but they may also delay the onset of dementia for many people.

    In his New Zealand lectures, Dr Small will outline that if we take charge of our everyday lifestyle choices, we can push back the age at which Alzheimer’s symptoms might begin – perhaps by several years, which in some cases can mean for the rest of our lives. Even if scientists one day come up with a miracle drug that can cure dementia, it will always be easier to protect healthy brain cells than to try to repair damaged ones. For now, prevention is the key to protecting our brains.

    Many people are confused about what all of the latest scientific information means and how it applies to their own lives. During this lecture, Dr Small will clarify this confusion and provide an easy-to-follow plan of action from his best-selling book The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program to improve memory ability now and optimise your brain health for the future.

    BOOKINGS ONLINE ESSENTIAL

    Register your booking at https://small-lecture-auckland.eventbrite.co.nz

    Seats will go quickly: book early! 

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